vice presidnr har ladat i Kaula Labur i Malaisa

 

 

.

 

Source: Somalilandedu.com

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© Copyright 2004-2007: Hargeysa News Network
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Somaliland seeks Malaysia´s assistance

Somaliland Seeks Malaysia’s Assistance

UTUSAN MALAYSIA,

 

Putrajaya 18July.-Somaliland which is currently pushing for its independence to be recognized by the international community has voiced out its interest in seeking Malaysia’s assistance, particularly in attracting investments in the country’s development.  

The former Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad said that the leaders of Somaliland have requested him to assist in developing the country. 

“They asked me to play the role not from within the government but from outside. I am happy to provide that assistance and support. 

Businessmen from Malaysia can venture and invest there as Somaliland is extensively involved in the livestock industry”, he said this during a delegation of several ministers’ visit to the Premier Leadership Foundation today.  

The delegation was represented by Somaliland’s Vice president HE Ahmad Yusuf Yassin, Foreign Minister Abdihlahi Mohamed Dualeh, Agriculture Minister Dr. Idris Abdi and Deputy Minister of Commerce Mr. Abdihalim Ali.  

Somaliland declared its independence from Somalia in 1991 after going through political crisis in 1980’s but the independence have not yet received international recognition.  

The country joined Somalia in 1960, after obtaining its independence from Britain. 

Dr. Mahathir added “Somaliland is a separate and different country from Somalia, but since it is regarded as a part of Somalia, it cannot be free”. 

“At the present time Somaliland is very stable and they are interested in Malaysia’s assistance and contribution in developing the country”. 

At the same time, Dr. Mahathir confirmed that he will be attending the 8th Global International Dialogue (LID) in Langkawi from 6th to 8 th August 2007.

Somalilands vice president Ahmed Yasin i Malasia

Somalilands Vice president Ahmed Yasin och hans delegation är i Malasia besök. Det här första gången en högt uppsat ledare från Somaliland besöker i Kaula Lambur i Malasia för att träffa den malasisika företräfare och företrade från närinslivet i Malasia. Här skakar hand vise presidnet Ahned Yasin med förre detta primär ministern Dr. Mahathir Moahamed. Innan president Rayale kom besök till Sverige tog han emot en delegation från Malasia som vill investera Somaliland.

From Ghana: Somaliland Seminar at AU Summit in Accra

From Ghana: Somaliland Seminar at AU Summit in Accra

Communiqué on the Visit to Ghana of the Somaliland Minister of Foreign Affairs on the Occasion of the African Union Summit, 23 June- 3 July 2007, Accra

On the instructions of His Excellency President Dahir Rayale Kahin, President of the Republic of Somaliland, the Foreign Minister of Somaliland Minister Abdillahi Duale paid a Visit to Ghana from 23 June to 3 July 2007.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland was accompanied by the Ghanaian & Western African Special Envoy on Somaliland, Mr. Steve Mawuenyega and other senior African advisors.

Communiqué on the Visit to Ghana of the Somaliland Minister of Foreign Affairs on the Occasion of the African Union Summit, 23 June- 3 July 2007, Accra

On the instructions of His Excellency President Dahir Rayale Kahin, President of the Republic of Somaliland, the Foreign Minister of Somaliland Minister Abdillahi Duale paid a Visit to Ghana from 23 June to 3 July 2007.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland was accompanied by the Ghanaian & Western African Special Envoy on Somaliland, Mr. Steve Mawuenyega and other senior African advisors.

The Ghanaian Foreign Minister Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo welcomed the Foreign Minister of Somaliland and his delegation to Ghana, and reiterated Ghana’s commitment to peace and stability in the Horn of Africa as a pre-requisite to continental union.

The two countries acknowledged the need to advance and consolidate Somaliland’s stability, its emerging democracy and peace in the Horn of Africa.

The Parties reaffirmed the need to identify key areas such as education, economic investments as a vehicle to drive forward areas of co-operation between the two countries. Ghanaian business institutions expressed willingness to share their expertise for Somaliland’s up-coming Presidential election identification process and investment opportunities.

Both Parties noted that since the establishment of Somaliland’s presidential and parliamentary democracy in 2003 and 2005 respectively, a number of bilateral

agreements including on Development and Security Co-operation have been signed with Ethiopia and the UK.

During the Visit, the Foreign Minister of Somaliland, met with key Ghanaian institutions such as the chair of Foreign Affairs Committee of Parliament, the Commandant of Koffi Anan International Training Centre, the Head of Ghanaian Investment Development Centre. The Minister also met with his counterparts the Foreign Ministers of Kenya and Ethiopia and the representatives of a number of countries such as South Africa, Cape Verde, Canada, Portugal, Turkey and USA, on the sidelines of the AU Summit.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland congratulated HE President John Kufoor for his tenure as Chairman of the African Union and for successfully hosting the AU Heads of States and Government Summit during his visit to Ghana where issues of continental integration were discussed and ratified, including the key protocol on the African Union Non-Aggression and Common Defense pact, which is critical for the integration and success of the African Union.

The two Parties also exchanged views on the latest regional, continental and international developments. Both Parties recalled Nepad’s strategic goal of advancing stability and good governance in Africa as the official development policy of Africa.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland briefed the Foreign Minister of Ghana on the growing bi-lateral relations with Somaliland’s key neighbour Ethiopia and the on-going exchange of visits between Addis Ababa and Hargeisa including the recent meeting of the Ethiopian Foreign Minister of State in Hargeisa with H.E. the Somaliland President and the recent meeting of H.E. the Ethiopian Prime Minister with H.E. the Somaliland President in Addis Ababa. Also discussed was the recent successful meeting held between the President of Somaliland and the Italian Minister for African Affairs as well as the briefings on the visit to Sweden and Norway.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland commended and thanked the Foreign Minister of Ghana for raising the matter of Somaliland at the Executive Council Meeting of the African Union on 29 June 2007. Both Parties, recalled that Professor Alpha Konare, Chairman of the African Union Commission, while presenting his annual report at this Executive Council meeting emphasised that the African continent had to deal with the reality of Somaliland’s existence and to engage with the unsettled international legal status. This follows through on the African Union’s Executive Council Meeting in Addis Ababa of 26 January 2007, where the then Chairman of the Executive Council from the Republic of Congo, concluded:

“…there is a reality in Somaliland that cannot be ignored. …. We cannot afford to close our eyes or shy away from that reality. It is in the interest of Africa to pay attention to these issues. There were positive developments in Somaliland, including the restoration of stability and peace, the establishment of democratic institutions and processes and the efforts deployed internally towards reconstruction. Some of these achievements in Somaliland should inspire the rest of Somalia. This is an issue that is now known to the African Union policy organs and it should be discussed at an appropriate time”.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland briefed his counterparts that Somaliland has taken the principled policy decision to allow diplomacy to take its path, since its engagement with the African Union since 2003. Its now 16 years since the establishment of Somaliland and its people have patiently endured the pain of the difficulties of non-recognition, notably the pain of meeting the UN Millennium Development Goals, especially in health, education and housing. It clear that the international community, via the regional body IGAD, is holding Somaliland’s people and its children prisoner to events in Mogadishu, by suggesting that Somaliland await the outcome of the up-coming Mogadishu National Reconciliation Conference. IGAD countries are intensely divided, more concerned about Mogadishu and are unable to engage Somaliland’s case for self-determination and to advance this emerging democracy as a reliable partner of the family of nations.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland expressed with regret that that the delay of advancing the case of Somaliland will sadly lead the Government of Somaliland and its people to review its existing foreign and defense policy and to seriously consider other options. The clear neglect of Somaliland’s urgent humanitarian and development needs by the international community has led the masses and many senior Somaliland elders to question the credibility and legitimacy of promoting the diplomatic approach to Somaliland’s quest for international recognition.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland further re-iterated that Somaliland wishes good relations with Somalia and to see Somalia a stable and peaceful neighbour. We are ready to share our experience of national reconciliation, state building and the creation of a successful democracy and to assist in stabilising the south in any way we can. The Minister urged the Transitional Federal Institutions to focus on stabilising the still difficult situation in Mogadishu rather than opposing the reality that is Somaliland’s independent status. The TFI’s obstructionist and uncreative approach to Somaliland’s quest for international recognition and further developing its nascent democracy adds unnecessary tension in the Horn of Africa and undermines its own efforts to stabilise Mogadishu.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland commended the Ghanaian Parliamentary delegation for its fact-finding visit to Somaliland in March 2007. Both Parties reiterated that peace, democracy and stability are a prerequisite for socio-economic development in the region and the continent.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland commended Ghana as a non-permanent member for its role at the United Nations Security Council and for advancing the African agenda.

Discussions were conducted in a friendly and frank manner reminiscent of the re-emerging sisterly links between the countries.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland on behalf of the Government of the Republic of Somaliland and its people expressed his gratitude to HE President John Kufoor, the Government and the people of Ghana for the warm hospitality accorded to him and his delegation throughout their stay in Ghana. The Minister, once again, expressed Somaliland’s appreciation for hosting H.E. President Kahin’s on the historic occasion of Ghana’s 50 Years Celebration on 3 March 2007.

ISSUED IN ACCRA, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Somaliland,
3 July 2007

Inquiries: + 233 24 941 41 87 or +233 24 344 47 19 Mr. Steve Mawuenyega

agreements including on Development and Security Co-operation have been signed with Ethiopia and the UK.

During the Visit, the Foreign Minister of Somaliland, met with key Ghanaian institutions such as the chair of Foreign Affairs Committee of Parliament, the Commandant of Koffi Anan International Training Centre, the Head of Ghanaian Investment Development Centre. The Minister also met with his counterparts the Foreign Ministers of Kenya and Ethiopia and the representatives of a number of countries such as South Africa, Cape Verde, Canada, Portugal, Turkey and USA, on the sidelines of the AU Summit.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland congratulated HE President John Kufoor for his tenure as Chairman of the African Union and for successfully hosting the AU Heads of States and Government Summit during his visit to Ghana where issues of continental integration were discussed and ratified, including the key protocol on the African Union Non-Aggression and Common Defense pact, which is critical for the integration and success of the African Union.

The two Parties also exchanged views on the latest regional, continental and international developments. Both Parties recalled Nepad’s strategic goal of advancing stability and good governance in Africa as the official development policy of Africa.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland briefed the Foreign Minister of Ghana on the growing bi-lateral relations with Somaliland’s key neighbour Ethiopia and the on-going exchange of visits between Addis Ababa and Hargeisa including the recent meeting of the Ethiopian Foreign Minister of State in Hargeisa with H.E. the Somaliland President and the recent meeting of H.E. the Ethiopian Prime Minister with H.E. the Somaliland President in Addis Ababa. Also discussed was the recent successful meeting held between the President of Somaliland and the Italian Minister for African Affairs as well as the briefings on the visit to Sweden and Norway.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland commended and thanked the Foreign Minister of Ghana for raising the matter of Somaliland at the Executive Council Meeting of the African Union on 29 June 2007. Both Parties, recalled that Professor Alpha Konare, Chairman of the African Union Commission, while presenting his annual report at this Executive Council meeting emphasised that the African continent had to deal with the reality of Somaliland’s existence and to engage with the unsettled international legal status. This follows through on the African Union’s Executive Council Meeting in Addis Ababa of 26 January 2007, where the then Chairman of the Executive Council from the Republic of Congo, concluded:

“…there is a reality in Somaliland that cannot be ignored. …. We cannot afford to close our eyes or shy away from that reality. It is in the interest of Africa to pay attention to these issues. There were positive developments in Somaliland, including the restoration of stability and peace, the establishment of democratic institutions and processes and the efforts deployed internally towards reconstruction. Some of these achievements in Somaliland should inspire the rest of Somalia. This is an issue that is now known to the African Union policy organs and it should be discussed at an appropriate time”.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland briefed his counterparts that Somaliland has taken the principled policy decision to allow diplomacy to take its path, since its engagement with the African Union since 2003. Its now 16 years since the establishment of Somaliland and its people have patiently endured the pain of the difficulties of non-recognition, notably the pain of meeting the UN Millennium Development Goals, especially in health, education and housing. It clear that the international community, via the regional body IGAD, is holding Somaliland’s people and its children prisoner to events in Mogadishu, by suggesting that Somaliland await the outcome of the up-coming Mogadishu National Reconciliation Conference. IGAD countries are intensely divided, more concerned about Mogadishu and are unable to engage Somaliland’s case for self-determination and to advance this emerging democracy as a reliable partner of the family of nations.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland expressed with regret that that the delay of advancing the case of Somaliland will sadly lead the Government of Somaliland and its people to review its existing foreign and defense policy and to seriously consider other options. The clear neglect of Somaliland’s urgent humanitarian and development needs by the international community has led the masses and many senior Somaliland elders to question the credibility and legitimacy of promoting the diplomatic approach to Somaliland’s quest for international recognition.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland further re-iterated that Somaliland wishes good relations with Somalia and to see Somalia a stable and peaceful neighbour. We are ready to share our experience of national reconciliation, state building and the creation of a successful democracy and to assist in stabilising the south in any way we can. The Minister urged the Transitional Federal Institutions to focus on stabilising the still difficult situation in Mogadishu rather than opposing the reality that is Somaliland’s independent status. The TFI’s obstructionist and uncreative approach to Somaliland’s quest for international recognition and further developing its nascent democracy adds unnecessary tension in the Horn of Africa and undermines its own efforts to stabilise Mogadishu.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland commended the Ghanaian Parliamentary delegation for its fact-finding visit to Somaliland in March 2007. Both Parties reiterated that peace, democracy and stability are a prerequisite for socio-economic development in the region and the continent.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland commended Ghana as a non-permanent member for its role at the United Nations Security Council and for advancing the African agenda.

Discussions were conducted in a friendly and frank manner reminiscent of the re-emerging sisterly links between the countries.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland on behalf of the Government of the Republic of Somaliland and its people expressed his gratitude to HE President John Kufoor, the Government and the people of Ghana for the warm hospitality accorded to him and his delegation throughout their stay in Ghana. The Minister, once again, expressed Somaliland’s appreciation for hosting H.E. President Kahin’s on the historic occasion of Ghana’s 50 Years Celebration on 3 March 2007.

ISSUED IN ACCRA, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Somaliland,
3 July 2007

Inquiries: + 233 24 941 41 87 or +233 24 344 47 19 Mr. Steve Mawuenyega

agreements including on Development and Security Co-operation have been signed with Ethiopia and the UK.

During the Visit, the Foreign Minister of Somaliland, met with key Ghanaian institutions such as the chair of Foreign Affairs Committee of Parliament, the Commandant of Koffi Anan International Training Centre, the Head of Ghanaian Investment Development Centre. The Minister also met with his counterparts the Foreign Ministers of Kenya and Ethiopia and the representatives of a number of countries such as South Africa, Cape Verde, Canada, Portugal, Turkey and USA, on the sidelines of the AU Summit.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland congratulated HE President John Kufoor for his tenure as Chairman of the African Union and for successfully hosting the AU Heads of States and Government Summit during his visit to Ghana where issues of continental integration were discussed and ratified, including the key protocol on the African Union Non-Aggression and Common Defense pact, which is critical for the integration and success of the African Union.

The two Parties also exchanged views on the latest regional, continental and international developments. Both Parties recalled Nepad’s strategic goal of advancing stability and good governance in Africa as the official development policy of Africa.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland briefed the Foreign Minister of Ghana on the growing bi-lateral relations with Somaliland’s key neighbour Ethiopia and the on-going exchange of visits between Addis Ababa and Hargeisa including the recent meeting of the Ethiopian Foreign Minister of State in Hargeisa with H.E. the Somaliland President and the recent meeting of H.E. the Ethiopian Prime Minister with H.E. the Somaliland President in Addis Ababa. Also discussed was the recent successful meeting held between the President of Somaliland and the Italian Minister for African Affairs as well as the briefings on the visit to Sweden and Norway.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland commended and thanked the Foreign Minister of Ghana for raising the matter of Somaliland at the Executive Council Meeting of the African Union on 29 June 2007. Both Parties, recalled that Professor Alpha Konare, Chairman of the African Union Commission, while presenting his annual report at this Executive Council meeting emphasised that the African continent had to deal with the reality of Somaliland’s existence and to engage with the unsettled international legal status. This follows through on the African Union’s Executive Council Meeting in Addis Ababa of 26 January 2007, where the then Chairman of the Executive Council from the Republic of Congo, concluded:

“…there is a reality in Somaliland that cannot be ignored. …. We cannot afford to close our eyes or shy away from that reality. It is in the interest of Africa to pay attention to these issues. There were positive developments in Somaliland, including the restoration of stability and peace, the establishment of democratic institutions and processes and the efforts deployed internally towards reconstruction. Some of these achievements in Somaliland should inspire the rest of Somalia. This is an issue that is now known to the African Union policy organs and it should be discussed at an appropriate time”.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland briefed his counterparts that Somaliland has taken the principled policy decision to allow diplomacy to take its path, since its engagement with the African Union since 2003. Its now 16 years since the establishment of Somaliland and its people have patiently endured the pain of the difficulties of non-recognition, notably the pain of meeting the UN Millennium Development Goals, especially in health, education and housing. It clear that the international community, via the regional body IGAD, is holding Somaliland’s people and its children prisoner to events in Mogadishu, by suggesting that Somaliland await the outcome of the up-coming Mogadishu National Reconciliation Conference. IGAD countries are intensely divided, more concerned about Mogadishu and are unable to engage Somaliland’s case for self-determination and to advance this emerging democracy as a reliable partner of the family of nations.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland expressed with regret that that the delay of advancing the case of Somaliland will sadly lead the Government of Somaliland and its people to review its existing foreign and defense policy and to seriously consider other options. The clear neglect of Somaliland’s urgent humanitarian and development needs by the international community has led the masses and many senior Somaliland elders to question the credibility and legitimacy of promoting the diplomatic approach to Somaliland’s quest for international recognition.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland further re-iterated that Somaliland wishes good relations with Somalia and to see Somalia a stable and peaceful neighbour. We are ready to share our experience of national reconciliation, state building and the creation of a successful democracy and to assist in stabilising the south in any way we can. The Minister urged the Transitional Federal Institutions to focus on stabilising the still difficult situation in Mogadishu rather than opposing the reality that is Somaliland’s independent status. The TFI’s obstructionist and uncreative approach to Somaliland’s quest for international recognition and further developing its nascent democracy adds unnecessary tension in the Horn of Africa and undermines its own efforts to stabilise Mogadishu.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland commended the Ghanaian Parliamentary delegation for its fact-finding visit to Somaliland in March 2007. Both Parties reiterated that peace, democracy and stability are a prerequisite for socio-economic development in the region and the continent.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland commended Ghana as a non-permanent member for its role at the United Nations Security Council and for advancing the African agenda.

Discussions were conducted in a friendly and frank manner reminiscent of the re-emerging sisterly links between the countries.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland on behalf of the Government of the Republic of Somaliland and its people expressed his gratitude to HE President John Kufoor, the Government and the people of Ghana for the warm hospitality accorded to him and his delegation throughout their stay in Ghana. The Minister, once again, expressed Somaliland’s appreciation for hosting H.E. President Kahin’s on the historic occasion of Ghana’s 50 Years Celebration on 3 March 2007.

ISSUED IN ACCRA, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Somaliland,
3 July 2007

Inquiries: + 233 24 941 41 87 or +233 24 344 47 19 Mr. Steve Mawuenyega

Bittersweet independence

Bittersweet independence

By Dahir Riyale Kahin
June 26, 2007

On this day 47 years ago, the Union Jack came down on a remote corner of Africa and the former protectorate of British Somaliland, with its capital in Hargeisa, gained independence.
It was a day of celebration. Freedom had been granted without a fight; no insurgency like Kenya’s Mau Mau or civil war as happened in Zimbabwe. Alas, all that and worse would follow, but in 1960, Somaliland was seen as a place of promise, where races, religions and people from different backgrounds got on well. Indeed, many of the British civil servants were sad to leave and some stayed on as welcome members of our new republic.
A week later, we entered into voluntary union with the former Italian Somaliland to the south, creating Somalia with its capital in Mogadishu, but today the old boundaries are back and, while we can’t undo the past, we must learn from it.
So, please, allow me a few paragraphs while I chronicle what happened, because those events have shaped the way I and my people view the present.
Somalia got off to a good start, but the 1960s and 1970s were a tough time for democracy and all too soon we found ourselves ruled by a military dictator.
One by one, our freedoms disappeared. Media fell under state control; opposition parties were banned; critics vanished in the night and those who came back were scarred by torture. English — our second language in the North — was spurned by the Italian-speaking south; all power went to Mogadishu and, by the 1980s, Somaliland had became a poor relation with run-down schools, little investment and no say in how the country was run.
In 1985, the North known today as the Republic of Somaliland sought to regain its independence and so began a war of liberation. The late dictator Siad Barre, who ruled Somalia at the time, responded by bombing whole towns and villages and, when that did not turn the people of Somaliland, his army lined up thousands of civilians along the banks of the Maroodijeex river that flows through Hargeisa and opened fire on them with machine guns. The skeletons are still there, just below the sand. When Barre was overthrown in 1991, Somalia fell into chaos. The United States tried to help and President Clinton sent troops, but it was too little, too late. Unwilling to be trapped in a failed state, the former British Somaliland retook its independence on May 18, 1991, and, 16 years on, the peace and prosperity we had hoped for in 1960 is back on track.
Historically, our marriage with the South wasn’t that long when you think of countries like Czechoslovakia, which lasted almost a century before creating the Czech and Slovak republics. But like the nations of Eastern Europe that split from the Soviet Union, or Eritrea in its break from Ethiopia, the divorce is permanent and this is the key to understanding Somaliland.

The African Union & Somaliland

The African Union & Somaliland
Accra 1-day Symposium, Wednesday 27 June 2007  Hosted by Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centrein conjunction with the University of South Africa’sDepartment of Religious Studies and ArabicSupported by Somaliland’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs This 1-day Symposium was established on the historic occasion of the African Union Summit in Accra and Ghana’s 50 Years independence celebrations. This forum intends to discuss issues of concern to regional and continental development and security.  The Symposium will focus on Somaliland’s stability, challengers and its future in the twenty-first century Horn of Africa and Africa.  On 18 May 2007, Somaliland celebrated 16 years of stability and self-governance.  Key achievements included the December 2002 first Local Government elections, followed in April 2003 by a Presidential election, the first in 36 years! On 29 September 2005, Somaliland conducted their first parliamentary elections in which three political parties contested the 82 seats seat in the House of Representatives, thus completing the long, difficult transition from a traditional, clan-based political system to a stable multi-party democracy in Somaliland. Somaliland has realised these achievements in spite of near-total international isolation. The absence of international recognition has crippled its economy, excluded Somaliland from regional and continental security arrangements and obscured a genuine African success story. The development of its resources and its people can go no further under such circumstances: its currency, the Somaliland shilling cannot be traded, it has no access to loans or grants from international financial institutions, and it cannot attract foreign investment to exploit our oil, gas and mineral reserves.  There are a number of reasons why this topic is important, as a number of key African states are beginning to advance the case of Somaliland within the African Union, including Rwanda. Firstly, Somaliland’s security and stability in the Horn of Africa is an essential prerequisite to its development, as it prepares for its second democratic Presidential elections in 2008 and with the increasing instability and violence in neighbouring Mogadisho. Second, Somaliland’s home-grown and hard–earned stability and emerging democracy face short- or medium-term threats. Third, the African Union (AU) is no stranger to Somaliland and has undertaken a fact-finding mission to perform a range of security-related tasks, including diplomacy, peace support and humanitarian assistance.  And thirdly, there are related concerns about the ability of Somaliland’s military – like their counterparts elsewhere – to deal with 21st century security issues: notably, terrorism, rebuilding failed states, and employing the appropriate methods. OutputIn addition to the obvious networking value of the event, select papers will, along with a summary, form the basis of a collated report to be widely distributed to key opinion-formers. Short summary presentations (12-20 minutes) are encouraged.  Inquiries: Dr. Kwesi Anning at kwesi.aning@kaiptc.org or Dr. Iqbal Jhazbhay at iqbal@unisa.ac.za

PROGRAMME : Wednesday 27 June 2007

  

0930   : Chair & Introduction, Dr. Kwesi Aning ( Head: Conflict Prevention, Management & Resolution, Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre (KAIPTC))

 Welcome, Major General JK Attipoe, Commandant, KAIPTC   1000 :   Somaliland‘s Emerging Democracy and Economy: The Way to Consolidation            Minister Abdillahi Duale (Somaliland Foreign Minister)   1045 :  Somaliland : Post-War Nation-Building & the Challenge of International  RecognitionDr. Iqbal Jhazbhay (University of South Africa) 1115: Questions & Discussion            Respondent: Minister Seyoum Mesfin (Ethiopian Minister of Foreign Affairs)    Group photo  1200:  Lunch 

1300 : Chair:  Ambassador Chris Kpodo (former Director- General of the Ghanain

            Ministry of Foreign Affairs)

 1400 :  Reflections on the Ghanaian Parliamentary Fact-Finding Visit to SomalilandMr. Okercheri Edusa (Chair, Foreign Affairs Committee, Parliament of Ghana)   1420 : Questions & Discussion 

15.00 : Summation: Dr. Iqbal Jhazbhay 

 15.20 : Tea & Snacks