Somaliland1991 Blogg media firar sitt 10 års jubileum

Somaliland1991 Blogg media firar sitt 10 års jubileum

Bildresultat för 10 years anniversary from 2007-2017

Somaliland1991 Blogg media firar sitt 10 års jubileum. Den startades mars 2007. Det är 10 års sedan. Vi är jätte glada över att vi har öppnat bloggen och publicerats nyheter, artiklar, debatt, bilder, video som rör om Somaliland med hög kvalitet. Vi är jätte tacksamma över läsare som har följs oss alla dessa år (tio år) från hela världen.

Vi kommer att fortsätta publicera nyheter och artiklar, debatt om Somaliland i framtiden

Tack så hemsk mycket

Blogg Manager

Cadnaan Qorane

29 juli 2017

 

Advertisements

Somaliland1991 blog media celebrating 10 th anniversary . from 2007-2017.

Bildresultat för 10 years anniversary from 2007-2017

 

Somaliland1991 Blog media celebrates its 10 year anniversary. It started in March 2007. It is 10 years ago. We are really glad that we have opened the blog and published news, articles, debates, pictures, videos about Somaliland with high quality. We are very grateful to readers who have been following us all these years (ten years) from all over the world.

We will continue to publish news and articles, debate about Somaliland in the future
Thank you so much

Blog Manager
Cadnaan Qorane
29 July 2017

Somaliland1991 blog media oo u dabaal degaysa 10 sanno guuradii ka soo wareegtay maalintii la aasaasay.

 

 

Somaliland1991 blog oo u dabaal degaysa  10 sanno  guuradii ka soo wareegtay maalintii la aasaasay.

Bildresultat för 10 years anniversary from 2007-2017

Waxa aannu maanta u dabaal degaynaa 10 sanno  guuradii ka soo wareegtay maalintii aannu samaynay mareegta (blog) Somaliland1991. Waxa aannu aasaasnay bishii mars 2007. Waxa annu  aad iyo aad ugu faraxsan nahay 10 ka sanno ee uu blog-u Somaliland1991 jiray.

Waxa aannu soo gelinaynay, warar, maqaallo, dood iyo muuqaallo video ah oo tayadoodu aad u sarayso. Waxa aannu ku soo qoraynay afaf kala duwan. Af soomaali, af ingiriisi iyo af iswedhish.  Waxa aannu aad iyo aad ugu mahad celinaynaa dhammaan dadkii mudadda dheer la socday blog-a Somaliland1991. amma ku xidhnaa ee kala jooga cidhifyada adduunka.

Insh waanu sii wadi doonaa mustaqbalka baahinta wararka, maqaalada iyo doodaha ku saabsan Somaliland.

Aad iyo aad baad u mahadsan tihiin

Maareeyaha Somaliland1991 News Center

Cadnaan Qorane

29 Juli 2019

 

Somaliland1991 blog celebrating 10 th anniversary . from 2007-2017.

 

Somaliland1991 blog celebrating 10 th anniversary . from 2007-2017.

 

Bildresultat för 10 years anniversary from 2007-2017

Somaliland1991 blog celebrating 10 th anniversary . from 2007-2017.

 

Waxa aannu maanta u dabaal degaynaa 10 sanno  guuradii ka soo wareegtay maalintii aannu samaynay mareegta (blog) Somaliland1991. Waxa aannu aasaasnay bishii mars 2007. Waxa aannu  aad iyo aad ugu faraxsan nahay 10 ka sanno ee uu blog-u Somaliland1991 jiray. Waxa aannu soo gelinaynay, warar, maqaallo, dood iyo muuqaallo video ah oo tayadoodu aad u sarayso.

Waxa aannu ku soo qoraynay afaf kala duwan. Af soomaali, af ingiriisi iyo af iswedhish.  Waxa aannu aad iyo aad ugu mahad celinaynaa dhammaan dadkii mudadda dheer la socday blog-a Somaliland1991. amma ku xidhnaa ee kala jooga cidhifyada adduunka.

 

 

 

Svenska/Swedish

Somaliland1991 Blogg media firar sitt 10 års jubileum. Den startades mars 2007. Det är 10 års sedan. Vi är jätte glada över att vi har öppnat bloggen och publicerats nyheter, artiklar, debatt, bilder, video som rör om Somaliland med hög kvalitet. Vi är jätte tacksamma över läsare som har följs oss alla dessa år (tio år) från hela världen. Vi kommer att fortsätta publicera nyheter och artiklar, debatt om Somaliland i framtiden

Tack så hemsk mycket

Blogg Manager

Cadnaan /Qorane

29 juli 2017

English

Somaliland1991 Blog media celebrates its 10 year anniversary. It started in March 2007. It is 10 years ago. We are really glad that we have opened the blog and published news, articles, debates, pictures, videos about Somaliland with high quality. We are very grateful to readers who have been following us all these years (ten years) from all over the world.

We will continue to publish news and articles, debate about Somaliland in the future
Thank you so much

Blog Manager
Cadnaan Qorane
29 July 2017

 

Bildresultat för 10 years anniversary from 2007-2017

Somaliland1991 blog celebrating 10 th anniversary . from 2007-2017.

Somaliland1991 blog celebrating 10 th anniversary . from 2007-2017.

 

Somaliland1991

 

Video: Somaliland’s longstanding drought has crippled the economy (france24)

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwND8vENzHM

Video: Somaliland’s longstanding drought has crippled the economy

© FRANCE 24 screengrab | Somaliland

Video by FRANCE 24

Latest update : 2017-07-22

Somaliland’s three-year-long drought has crippled the economy ofthe breakaway, semi-desert territory in the Horn of Africa.

The fact that the state is not recognised internationally means that it is ineligible to access vital funds from the World Bank or the International Monetary Fund.

A former British colony, Somaliland gained autonomy from Somalia in 1991 but has yet to gain membership to the United Nations. Around 2 million people, nearly half its population, have been affected by the drought.

Authorities in Somaliland, which borders Djibouti, Ethiopia, Somalia and the Gulf of Aden, say that 80 percent of the livestock has died and that people have left the driest areas and settled in camps where aid is delivered.

“There was no rain in my area; the livestock had nothing to eat,” Faduma Abdelahi, who has lived on windy plains for the last two months, told FRANCE 24. “The animals were hungry, they were weak, they could not move and they died. The drought just went on and on and on.”

Those in the camps receive about a hundred dollars a month from non-governmental organisations that is transferred to their mobile phones.

Mowlid Mudan, from Save the Children Somaliland, told FRANCE 24 that the camp where he works makes cash transfers to 770 families.

The vast majority of families in Somaliland depend on cattle to make a living. As so many animals have died, the market price of a goat in Burao — the capital of the Togdheer region and Somaliland’s second city — has tripled. Subsequently, sustainable living has become impossible for countless families.

“We stand at a critical point in history,” UN Emergency Relief Coordinator Stephen O’Brien told the UN Security Council in March, in reference to the risk of famine in Kenya, Yemen, South Sudan and Somalia. “Already at the beginning of the year we are facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the creation of the UN,” he added.

Somaliland’s foreign minister has blamed the international community’s refusal to recognise the state 26 years after it declared independence for the territory’s ailing economy.

“Lack of recognition is proving a major problem,” Saad Ali Shire, Somaliland’s foreign minister, told The Guardian in May. “We do not receive bilateral aid. All aid goes to the third parties via the UN. If we were recognised, we could receive aid bilaterally, and attract international investors — so creating a more resilient economy that is less dependent on livestock.”

The country’s leaders believe that if they can persuade one swing state in the African Union, such as Ghana, to recognise the country, the rest of the international community would follow, according to The Guardian.

Date created : 2017-07-22

Source: France24

Horn of Africa a flash point for proxy battles among Gulf states

 

https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2017-07-28-horn-of-africa-a-flash-point-for-proxy-battles-among-gulf-states/#.WXrp0800TIo.facebook

 

 

Horn of Africa a flash point for proxy battles among Gulf states

    • PETER FABRICIUS
    • Africa
6 Reactions
Photo: An aerial view of Djibouti sea port on 19 March 2009.  EPA/MAZEN MAHDI

The fall-out between the Gulf states is exacerbating tensions in the Horn of Africa against the background of growing Middle East involvement in the region. By PETER FABRICIUS.

The major fall-out in the Gulf between Qatar on the one side and Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain on the other side has spilled over into the Horn of Africa, aggravating existing tensions and potentially increasing instability.

The Horn is in danger of becoming a field of proxy battles among Gulf states as it had been the site of proxy battles between the major powers during the Cold War, Omar Mahmood, a researcher at the Institute for Security Studies (ISS) in Addis Ababa said last week.

The dispute between the Gulf states, which erupted on June 5, had already impacted the Horn, causing Qatari peacekeepers to withdraw from the disputed border between Eritrea and Djibouti which they had been patrolling.

That was because Djibouti backed the Saudi/UAE side in the dispute with Qatar, Mahmood said, in an online briefing on the implications for Africa of the fall-out among the Gulf States. Saudi Arabia, UAE and Bahrain cut ties with Qatar on June 5. They gave Qatar an ultimatum of demands , including cutting ties with Iran, shutting down Al Jazeera TV network, ending Turkey’s military presence in Qatar and ceasing the funding of “terrorists.”

The latter referred to Qatar’s support for the Muslim Brotherhood which other Gulf states see as a threat to their rule, Mahmood said. Qatar rejected the demands.

He noted that other countries in the region like Egypt & Yemen, quickly followed Saudi Arabia’s lead, while some in Africa either had cut or downgraded relations with Qatar as well. These include Mauritania, Senegal, Chad, and Niger.

Meanwhile, Qatar had been receiving support from Turkey and Iran, creating a major split in the Middle East. However fellow Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) members Kuwait & Oman had stayed neutral, with Kuwait leading continuing mediation process.

Mahmood said although the timing of the break in the GCC had been linked to US President Donald Trump’s visit to the Middle East just before, there had been discontent already and probably some planning for the break. A similar break in relations had occurred in 2014, with some of the same issues.

He added that the Gulf fallout was having an impact on five countries in the Horn of Africa, Djibouti, Eritrea, Somalia, Somaliland, and Ethiopia. This was happening against the background of growing Middle East involvement in the Horn, mainly from Turkey, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE, over the last few years.

This “interesting geopolitical development” had caused shifts in foreign policy and other local power dynamics, with both positive and negative implications for the region.

For example, the Saudi-UAE partnership had successfully engineered the participation of a number of Horn countries in its war against Houthi rebels in Yemen, convincing them to break relations with Iran in the process.

“But, the division of the Arab world into two strong camps likely only increases the possibility of competition, and given the increased ties in recent years, the external feud has the potential to exacerbate ongoing tensions within the Horn of Africa as well,” Mahmood said.

That was partly because different Horn countries had come down on different sides of the Gulf dispute. Djibouti backed the Saudi-UAE side, downgrading its relations with Qatar just days after the dispute erupted. Djibouti’s relations with the UAE have been problematic, but it had joined Saudi Arabia’s anti-Houthi coalition, even expressing willingness to host a Saudi military base.

But even if Djibouti’s current stance was consistent, one consequence of it had been the departure of Qatari peacekeeping troops which had been patrolling its disputed border with Eritrea.

He noted that Djibouti had accused Eritrea of moving its troops into the territory to replace the Qataris and asked the African Union to take up the matter.

“The biggest danger is the potential to increase tensions in what was previously a fairly dormant flash point,” Mahmood said.

Eritrea appeared to be hedging its bets, expressing prompt support for Saudi Arabia’s decision to cut ties with Qatar which was consistent with its previous signing up to the anti-Houthi coalition fighting in Yemen and its current hosting of a UAE base in Assab.

But Mahmood said Eritrea had also not officially severed relations with Qatar and was insisting Qatar should continue it efforts to mediate the Djibouti border dispute.

And he said the Gulf dispute was further exacerbating existing tensions between Somalia and Somaliland, the breakaway, self-proclaimed state in the north which Mogadishu insists is still part of Somalia. Somaliland had already agreed to host the UAE’s second military base in the Horn, at its Berbera port.

Somalia views this as an infringement on its sovereignty as it regards Somaliland as part of its territory. Somali President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed (generally known as Farmajo) had visited UAE to discuss this.

Mahmood said the Gulf dispute was further increasing tensions as Somalia and Somaliland had taken different sides. Somaliland had naturally sided against Qatar, given its UAE military base and another civilian port deal in Berbera with Dubai Ports World.

Somalia had maintained neutral course, but Mahmood said in the context that was tantamount to siding with Qatar. Farmajo had rebuffed Saudi Arabia’s courtship possibly because Turkey had become a strong partner of Somalia’s and Turkey was in the Qatar camp.

The Gulf dispute was allowing Somaliland to further stake out an independent foreign policy from Somalia, which was supporting its demands for international recognition. Ethiopia had remained neutral in the Gulf dispute, to avoid being dragged into a fight in which it had little stake. But it had a major concern about Saudi

Arabia and the UAE’s recent engagement with Eritrea which had reduced Eritrea’s political isolation, undermining a key Ethiopian policy initiative to isolate its enemy.

“The increasing involvement of the Gulf states within the Horn has been one of the biggest game changers geopolitically in the region over the past few years,” Mahmood said. “It will provide opportunities for some, but others will lose out. This involvement could increase instability, and be viewed negatively by many.”

The hardening of positions in the Gulf indicated that the presence of the Gulf states in the Horn could “ultimately be more negative than positive for the Horn’s development, at least in the near future”.

“We are seeing this by the increasing tensions around regional flash points, such as the Djiboutian-Eritrean border and Somali-Somaliland relations

“In essence, the Horn could become divided by external dynamics and a ground for proxy battles once again, similar to how the Cold War played out in the region.”

The tensions could rise further if Saudi Arabia took an even harder line and used economic leverage, such as its livestock imports from the Horn, to compel countries there to take a tougher position against Qatar, Mahmood said. DM

Photo: An aerial view of Djibouti sea port on 19 March 2009. EPA/MAZEN MAHDI

Get overnight news and latest Dail

The insider’s cultural guide to Hargeisa: ‘the mother of Somali arts’

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/jul/27/insider-cultural-guide-hargeisa-somalia-arts-east-africa

 

 

The insider’s cultural guide to Hargeisa: ‘the mother of Somali arts’

East Africa’s biggest book fair and a packed cultural calendar jostle for space with bleating camels and peaceful hills in Somalia’s second-biggest city

A memorial monument in the midtown of Hargeisa
A memorial in Hargeisa marks Somaliland’s breakaway attempt in the 1980s. Photograph: Barkhad Kaariye

In five words

Sunny, peaceful, surrounded by hills

What sound defines your city?

It’s normal to see livestock in Hargeisa’s streets and hear the bleat of goats, camels and sheep. Hargeisa’s population depends economically on livestock production and trade. The sound here is mainly goats and sheep in one of Hargeisa’s bustling livestock markets.

Everyone’s tuning into …

Pinterest

Fanka iyo Suugaanta (which means “culture and arts”) is a popular weekly TV show aired on HCTV – a Somali TV station. Somali poets, singers and other artists are interviewed in this show. Almost everyone watches it, particularly young people. In this episode, the renowned singer Mohamed Said, known as BK, is the guest.

Best current venue?

Hiddo-Dhowr’s singers will take requests while you dine
Pinterest
Hiddo-Dhowr’s singers will take requests while you dine. Photograph: Barkhad Kaariye

Hiddo-Dhowr, a traditional Somali restaurant, is a place everyone visits – sometimes twice a week. Musicians and singers entertain the diners while they eat, singing both traditional and modern Somali songs on request. It’s the first of its kind to open in Hargeisa. Sahra Halgan, the owner, is herself a famous Somali singer and has recently returned from France to open the restaurant.

Who’s top of the playlist?

Pinterest

Xiddigaha Geeska (The Horn Stars) are a group of young and talented singers that are very popular in Hargeisa and all over Somalia.

They sing about nationalism and patriotism as part of a nationwide campaign made by the group during the national independence day celebrations on 18 May.

Favourite local artist

Pinterest
Hassan Dahir Ismail is perhaps the most famous young poet in Somalia.

Hassan Dahir, widely known as Weedhsame, is a poet popular among the younger generation in Somalia. His poems habitually focus on the social and political issues of the country.

The look on the street

Hargeisa fashion
Hargeisa fashion is a clash of styles Photograph: Barkhad Kaariye

Hargeisa’s street style is hybrid: religious, traditional and modern. There is a clash of cultures caused by this hybrid. The traditional way of dressing, such as the young man on the horse, is favoured by the older generation, whereas the more contemporary style of shaven heads, trousers and headphones favoured by the young is discouraged by the elder generation.

Best cultural Instagram?

The Hargeisa Cultural Center was opened in August 2014. Since its establishment, it has become an important feature in Hargeisa’s cultural landscape. It has an art gallery hosting both permanent and temporary art exhibitions, a rare books collection and a fully functional modern theatre. While being very contemporary, the building still takes its design from the traditional Somali aqal hut.

What’s the big talking point?

The House of Elders – Somaliland’s upper house of parliament – recently extended the tenure of the incumbent president and this brought the opposition parties leaders and the public out in protest. Almost everyone is debating the issue because, while democracy is what the country has adopted for the past 15 years, the public wants the elections to be held on time.

What your city does better than anyone …

Hargeisa is known as “the mother of Somali arts and culture”. Every night, a book launch, poetry event or gig takes place. If you are lucky, you might see Hirwo – a traditional Somali dance – taking place. For this dance, the men and women start by shouting praise at each other. After this, the dance begins to the soundtrack of clapping hands rather than music.

Big cultural moment

Pinterest
Hargeisa’s International Book Fair runs annually

Hargeysa International Book Fair (HIBF) is the main cultural event in Somaliland and one of the largest public celebrations of books in East Africa. HIBF has been running annually in Hargeisa for the past seven years. It brings together writers, poets, artists and thinkers from Somaliland and all over the world to share and discuss their art. The main aim of the festival is to promote a culture of reading and writing in the country, by producing and publishing high-quality Somali literature and translating international classical literature. The eighth Hargeysa International Book Fair will take place from 1 to 6 August 2015 with the theme of “spaces”.

Best street art?

Murals painted on the foundation of Hargeisa’s war memorial
Murals painted on the foundation of Hargeisa’s war memorial. Photograph: Barkhad Kaariye

Although Hargeisa is not that familiar with street art, the steel monuments standing in Hargeisa’s midtown pay tribute to what Somalilanders went through to regain their independence.

Regarded by locals as Hargeisa’s war memorial, the murals were originally painted by Mohamed Sharif (known as Al-Cataaz Arts), a local artist, in 2002. Often updated by other artists, the monument depicts how Somalia’s military regime bombed Hargeisa during the 1980s war between the government troops and Somali National Movement fighters. That bombardment, along with extra-judiciary executions, led to the death of 200,000 men, women and children, according to the government’s genocide commission.

From me

Barkhad
Pinterest
Photograph: Barkhad Kaariye

Barkhad Kaariye is the founder of Somali Investigative Reports and has worked with BBC Media Action as a producer, presenter and blogger. Currently, he works with Voice of America’s Somali Service as a stringer.

You can find him on twitter @BarkhadKaariye or on LinkedIn.