Sheffield recognise Somaliland

Halkan ka daawo sawiradii taariikhiga markii ay Sheffeild, ku aqoonsatay jamhuuriyadda Somaliland.

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Source: Salaanmedia

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Daawo Sawiro Dheeradda ah..Golahii degaanka Shaffield ee Ictiraafay Somaliland iyo sida shacabka Soomaaliland usoo buux dhaafiyeen.

| April 3, 2014 | 0 Comments
Waxa Shalay oo Arbacaa ah  dood dheer oo ay yeesheen golaha degaanka ee Shaffield UK ay cod loo qaaday ictiraafka Somaliland ay si wada-jir ah ay u ictiraafeen Soomaaliland.

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Lasoco Warkii oo dhan,Muqaal dhawaan Insha Allah.

Salaanmedia/Sheffield.

 

 

 

Somaliland Hails British Step Forward in Independence Bid

Saturday 05 April 2014 10:49 AMComments (0)

April 05, 2014

LONDON — A city in Britain has become the first to officially recognize Somaliland’s claim to independence. The vote — which is purely symbolic and carries no legal weight — is nevertheless being hailed by Somaliland leaders as a big step forward in their decades-long campaign to break away from Somalia.

Somaliland’s Foreign Minister Mohamed Bihi Yonis

 

 

Somalilanders celebrated outside Sheffield city hall after the council voted Thursday to recognize the region’s right to self-determination. Thousands of people of Somaliland origin live in the northern British city.

Somaliland’s Foreign Minister Mohamed Bihi Yonis attended the vote; he later told VOA of its symbolic importance. “Somaliland has the border, the population [in favor of independence], the currency, the independence, the elections, the democracy, the rule of law, the human rights record of Somaliland. And I think they have looked into all of those areas and realized that Somaliland has met the requirements of statehood.”

Somaliland occupies the northern section of Somalia.

The rest of the country has been plagued by lawlessness and violence since the overthrow of Somalia’s leader in 1991. Later that same year, Somalilanders voted in a referendum to become independent — a vote that has not been recognized by any nation.

Oasis of peace

Mohamed Yonis calls Somaliland a relative oasis of peace. “We have a proper functioning government and institutions, while the other part of Somalia is actually burning and having a lot of difficulties as you know — issues of piracy, terrorism, al-Shabab [Islamic militants].”

Somaliland did gain brief statehood upon its independence from Britain in June 1960. But its government chose to merge with Somalia.

 

Convincing the world that Somaliland should be recognized as independent will not be easy, according to Alex Vines of London-based policy analyst group Chatham House.

“Internationally, everybody says it would have to be led by Africa,” said Vines. “When you talk to African leaders, it’s like, ‘Well, we might consider it, but we wouldn’t be the first.’”

Somaliland authorities insist the region’s economy would support independence.

Source: VOA

 

UK – Sheffield Councillors and MPs from London to

debate Somaliland recognition

UK – Sheffield Councillors and MPs from London to debate Somaliland recognition

– Sheffield – March 28 2014 – Councillor Mohammad Maroof has initiated  the following motion in favour of the recognition of the republic of Somaliland in a debate to be held on the 2nd of April 2014 in Sheffield.


The motion was supported particularly by the local Somaliland communities and Councillors  in Sheffield as well as other Somaliland communities through out UK. The news of the debate  has been received with great relief and jubilation in Somaliland. Locals in Hargeisa have expressed  their happiness “with Britain  finally standing-up to the expectations by the people of Somaliland whom it colonised from 1884 to 1960 “.

Back ground : Somalilanders have been settling in Britain for well over a century. In the 19th century many arrived in Britain as seamen and traders and they settled close to ports such as London, Cardiff and Bristol. After World War Two with labour shortages in Britain many workers and their families came to the UK from overseas. Many Somalis came to Sheffield in the 1940s – 1960s period to work, often in the steel industry. Significantly more settled in the UK during the 1990s as they fled the civil war raging in their country. Most settled in London, however as there were existing communities in Sheffield, many were attracted northwards. Manchester and Leicester were also popular cities in which to settle.(Sheffield.Gov)

Following is a text caption of the motion to be debated on April 2, 2014 at Sheffield Council regarding the British recognition of the republic of Somaliland: 

“Notice of Motion Given By Councillor Mohammad Maroof of Sheffield ..
That this Council:

(a)       notes that thousands of people from Somaliland live in Sheffield and recognise and appreciate the important contribution they make to the City and the close ties Sheffield has with Somaliland;

(b)       supports the Somaliland community in Sheffield and their campaign to have Somaliland recognised as a sovereign state and gain a seat in the UN, with reasons for recognition including:

(i)         the Somaliland government believes that recognition would entrench democracy in the Horn of Africa;

(ii)        recognising Somaliland will aim to strengthen cooperation in the fight against terrorism, extremism, piracy, illegal fishing, toxic dumping, and other serious crimes; and

(iii)       the marketing of Somaliland as a safe tourist destination, primarily cultural and eco-tourism could also emerge as an important segment of the Somaliland economy;

(c)        notes that since 1991 Somaliland have had a democratically elected Government and President, in this time there have been 4 elections and changes of president, it looks after international waters with no piracy, it has opposition parties and is not a recipient of international aid;

(d)       believes that recognition will help to bring about stability in Somaliland, creating a situation where people can live in peace and harmony with the support of the International Community, and that recognition would bring international banks, jobs and finance;

(e)       welcomes the support for this campaign by local MP’s Paul Blomfield and Clive Betts and the work they are doing with the Cross Party Somaliland Group and would encourage other local MP’s to also support this Group; and

(f)        calls upon the Government to recognise Somaliland as an independent state and to encourage other Governments around the world to do the same.
By – Medeshi

 

 

Sheffield Recognises Somaliland’s Independence

(Yorkshire Times)

 

http://yorkshiretimes.co.uk/article/Sheffield-Recognises-Somalilands-Independence

 

On Wednesday 2 April, Sheffield City Council voted to pass a motion recognising Somaliland’s right to self-determination, and calling on “the British government to recognise Somaliland as an independent state and to encourage other governments around the world to do the same.”
The historic debate was tabled by Councillor Mohammad Maroof who yesterday received over 2,000 signatures from the Somaliland community in Sheffield, petitioning the council to support recognition.

The Foreign Minister of Somaliland, the country’s most senior statesman aside from the President, Mohamed Bihi Yonis spoke in the Council Chamber, “Somaliland is a peaceful, democratic nation, which has been striving to be recognised by the international community since declaring independence in 1991. Sheffield’s decision will help strengthen our campaign for recognition.”

Councillor Neale Gibson (Lab) noted that “Somaliland fulfils all the criteria for statehood required by international law. A permanent population. A defined territory. A government. And the capacity to enter into relations with other states.”

Councillor Ben Curran (Lab) said “We hope that Sheffield’s support is just the first step to helping Somaliland fulfil its right to self-determination.”

Councillor Julie Dore (Lab) said “We fundamentally believe in Somaliland’s right to self-determination.”

The Energy Minister of Somaliland Hussein Abdi Dualeh thanked local Labour MPs Paul Blomfield and Clive Betts as well as City Councillors for their support of Somaliland’s independence.

Somaliland sees this as an important, breakthrough moment for their campaign to be recognised as an independent nation by the international community. Their Independence Day will be celebrated around the world on 18 May.

On Friday, 4 April, Sheffield Central MP Paul Blomfield will be speaking at ISRAAC, the Somali Community and Cultural Association, in support of Somaliland’s case for recognition.

Somaliland has a strong legal case for recognition as an independent nation state, underpinned by historical precedent and the overwhelming support of the people of Somaliland who voted for independence in 2001. Somaliland was once part of the British Empire, joining with Italian ruled Somalia after gaining its independence in 1960. As Somalia disintegrated into chaos in the late 1980s Somaliland decided to re-establish its independence in 1991.Over the past two decades Somaliland has worked hard to create an island of peace in an otherwise difficult region. Functioning state institutions have been put in place; since 2000 five national elections have been held; free primary education has been introduced for boys and girls; progress is being made to reduce child mortality and female genital mutilation.Somalilanders have been settling in the UK for over a century, residing mainly in city ports such as London, Cardiff and Bristol. As part of the empire, Somaliland contributed to both the WW1 and WW2 efforts. Following WW2 many Somalilanders came to Sheffield to work, often in the steel industry, which was facing labour shortages.Further history on Somaliland’s case for international recognition can be found here: http://recognition.somalilandgov.com/history

Source:  Yorkshire Times

 

 

 

 

Big day of celebration for Sheffield’s Somalilanders

Sheffield’s Somaliland community danced and cheered as councillors voted in favour of recognising their home nation as an independent state.

The Peace Gardens came alive with singing, dancing, drumming and flag-waving as a motion tabled by Labour Coun Mohammad Maroof was passed by full council.

The historic move means Sheffield is the first local authority in the UK to recognise Somaliland as a sovereign state.

Coun Mahmood’s motion stated: “This council believes recognition will help to bring about stability in Somaliland. This council calls upon the Government to recognise Somaliland as an independent state and to encourage other governments around the world to do the same.”

Many men from Somaliland came to Sheffield after WW2 to work in steelworks.

Somaliland is in northwestern Somalia. It voted for independence in 1991 and has had democratically elected government since.

Source: The Star

 

UK Sheffield City Council to Vote on Recognising Somaliland

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